View Full Version: 30/03/11 - Eyeballs Interview

Sproutnet Community > Site News > 30/03/11 - Eyeballs Interview


Title: 30/03/11 - Eyeballs Interview


Jamie - March 30, 2011 04:42 PM (GMT)
The charmingly named site 'Slicing Up Eyeballs' have a new interview with Paddy, revealing still more details behind the making of Let's Change the World With Music. They also appear to be giving away copies of the US edition, if you can get here before April 8th. Thanks to John Austin for flagging this up.

qmbcole - March 30, 2011 05:38 PM (GMT)
Weíre all just paper on the wind, Grasshopper
:lol:

Rae - March 30, 2011 06:33 PM (GMT)
Brilliant interview, thanks! Spectacular one-liners. Really funny. Great read.

Jim_Williams - March 31, 2011 04:45 PM (GMT)
Great interview. The after dinner speech circuit awaits. Thoughtful and intelligent questions too.

For me, this said it all (although I'm still scrutinising this passage in order to ponder what exactly the aforementioned 'all' actually means):

"Can I tell you a secret? Iíve never thought too much about an audience. Iím too insecure to really warm to ďfeedback.Ē In fact, Iím too busy worrying that Iíll like what I do to worry about anyone elseís enjoyment. Is that a terrible thing to say? Does this mean Iím not touched if people like or dislike something Iíve written? No, Iím always moved by someoneís response. And even if someone really hates what I doÖ I donít want to sound like a masochist but visceral dislike is kind of interesting, too, donít you think?"

life's a miracle - April 1, 2011 02:42 PM (GMT)
QUOTE
"Can I tell you a secret? Iíve never thought too much about an audience. Iím too insecure to really warm to ďfeedback.Ē In fact, Iím too busy worrying that Iíll like what I do to worry about anyone elseís enjoyment. Is that a terrible thing to say? Does this mean Iím not touched if people like or dislike something Iíve written? No, Iím always moved by someoneís response. And even if someone really hates what I doÖ I donít want to sound like a masochist but visceral dislike is kind of interesting, too, donít you think?"


I find that this man, like all other artists, never ,if ever, rarely come to a total point of satisfaction or lasting bliss, with themselves or others. They are always en route to somewhere, anywhere, famed or no fame, rich or poor or all of the above.
Seems to me that Paddy is saying the same thing That Martha Graham once wrote.
"No artist is pleased.....there is no satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a strange , divine dissatisfaction , a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and making us more alive than the others."

If Paddy disagrees with Martha, then he has vastly deceived himself.

Jim_Williams - April 1, 2011 04:58 PM (GMT)
Wonderful Graham quote! Thanks, LAM.

Rivermoving - April 14, 2011 07:02 AM (GMT)
I missed this wonderul Martha Graham quote, which sums up the philosophy of any true artist. Indeed: contentment breeds indifference.

Wasn't it Paddy McAloon who used to say he wanted to re-record the entire "Swoon" album? And wasn't it Paddy who decided to re-record the songs released by Cher and Jimmy Nail - in effect "covering his own songs"?

Satisfaction is a fleeting moment, to be replaced by a surge to make better next time - or indeed, to refashion the fashioned. I think it was Goethe who said: "And refashioning the fashioned lest it stiffen into iron is work of endless vital activity."

Rivermoving - April 25, 2011 04:04 PM (GMT)
Fantastic interview! This should be mandator reading by any serious Sproutfan!

rock smith - May 15, 2011 02:47 PM (GMT)
http://www.magnetmagazine.com/2011/05/09/qa-with-lloyd-cole/
Q&A With Lloyd Cole:
Iím glad that Prefab Sprout have such a devoted following, still.


why am I posting this LC interview in this thread? cos I don't know where else to put it
;)

Rae - May 17, 2011 07:52 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (rock smith @ May 15 2011, 04:47 PM)
http://www.magnetmagazine.com/2011/05/09/qa-with-lloyd-cole/
Q&A With Lloyd Cole:
Iím glad that Prefab Sprout have such a devoted following, still.


why am I posting this LC interview in this thread? cos I don't know where else to put it
;)

That's a really nice interview, thanks, rock. You gotta admire Lloyd for hanging in there.

Also, apart from the Sprout reference, I think there're two other aspects which are interesting in the same context: Lloyd Cole has done a few things that have been suggested here for Paddy McAloon, or the absence of which has been lamented: get your fans to help finance your next record, and have a very active presence on the web.

It's pretty telling when Lloyd says that dealing with the label-and-fan-financed album was much too stressful for him and his wife; and that doing his own website and sharing stuff regularly has taken some of the mistery away from him as an artist. Which I'm sure are two things that would not work for Paddy McAloon: having to deal with stress and becoming less mysterious.

ronchito - May 17, 2011 02:36 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Rae @ May 17 2011, 03:52 AM)
Also, apart from the Sprout reference, I think there're two other aspects which are interesting in the same context: Lloyd Cole has done a few things that have been suggested here for Paddy McAloon, or the absence of which has been lamented: get your fans to help finance your next record, and have a very active presence on the web.

It's pretty telling when Lloyd says that dealing with the label-and-fan-financed album was much too stressful for him and his wife; and that doing his own website and sharing stuff regularly has taken some of the mistery away from him as an artist. Which I'm sure are two things that would not work for Paddy McAloon: having to deal with stress and becoming less mysterious.

Agreed, Rae -- I'm glad Lloyd addressed it. Out of ill-advised curiosity and excitement, I've occasionally been sucked into reading about and listening to bands' recordings-in-process and it's always left me feeling colder in the end when I hear the final product. For me, the mystery involved with hearing a body of work for the first time in full is key to an album's longevity. I think Paddy may have taken that mystery a bit too far, but then again we're all still here talking about him.


Robinbrevard - May 24, 2011 09:08 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (ronchito @ May 17 2011, 02:36 PM)
Out of ill-advised curiosity and excitement, I've occasionally been sucked into reading about and listening to bands' recordings-in-process and it's always left me feeling colder in the end when I hear the final product.

Interesting you should make this observation in the context of discussing Lloyd Cole & the Sprouts. LC's latest & most excellent release, "Broken Record" came as a deluxe edition (to fans who pre-ordered at Lloyd's official site).

"Making a Broken Record" is as great & enjoyable a listen for me as the finished product.

I agree this is not always the case, however. A cursory listen to the bonus disc that comes with Lucinda Williams' newest release will confirm this for many. Listening to her pre-production acoustic demos was about as exciting as watching paint dry. The latter may actually be more entertaining than the former...

Rae - May 25, 2011 11:31 AM (GMT)
I haven't heard that "Making of a Broken Record" CD, robin, (and I don't much like the album itself, to my own chagrin) but it's true that it's a nice addition for fans. Hell, I'd pay for something like that if Paddy McAloon put it out alongside his next album (unfortunately, one could say that he's been focussing on releasing making-ofs exclusively and dispensing with proper albums ...).

But overall, I agree with ronchito and would like to add to your Lucinda Williams experience: listening to Lloyd Cole's "Cleaning out the Ashtrays" compilation of demos and other offerings like that make me feel the same way I feel when I get roped into watching the making-ofs and behind-the-scences documentaries and the director's commentary on DVD releases of TV shows or films: I get itchy and the feeling that I'm wasting my time and should get on with my life becomes overwhelming.

By the way (and straying further and further off-topic), the latest Squeeze album Spot the Difference is a great exercise in getting new worth out of old material: It's an almost identical re-enactment of some of their most well-known material that serves three purposes: it's like a puzzle, because you're actually invited to spot the difference, it's also pretty much a piece of modern performance art, and also a brave attempt to take back possession of material they sold away when they were teenagers.

loaffish - May 25, 2011 12:25 PM (GMT)
Great interview, really enjoyed it , made me smile a lot.

ronchito - May 25, 2011 05:17 PM (GMT)
it's not so much the after-the-fact demo stuff that i'm against. it's the fans' involvement in a record before it's released that ruins it for me. when i listen to a record for the first time (& beyond, if it's good), i want to be transported to somewhere that i can't go on my own -- which can't happen if i already know what to look for. if i get regular updates about recording vocal harmonies on an album that i helped fund, or that they're adding in some flugelhorn during the bridge on track 3 which is called such-and-such, it satisfies my short-term curiosity but ruins the mysterious aspect of listening to a song for the first time. it makes it feel like a song or album is more of a commodity that i listen to with the anticipation of things that i've already learned about.

as an example, i've watched the "making of" queen's night at the opera album several times and marveled as brian may slides the faders up & down during his all-guitar dixieland jam on "good company". for whatever reason, that doesn't ruin the song for me -- i guess because i'll always have that first series of listens where it blindly blew me away and that feeling lingers. but if i'd been allowed to attend those recording sessions or somehow been privy to brian's recording process back then, i don't know that it would've been as much fun to listen to when it was finally released. i guess there's just something more attractive about a band going into hibernation and presenting a mysterious gift when they emerge.

if paddy ever allowed us to do a fund-raising for his next album, i'd only contribute on the condition that there'd be no discussion about timeframes or album content beforehand. it'd still feel weird but that's the only way i could see getting some enjoyment out of the end product.




* Hosted for free by InvisionFree