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Title: Wood burner I made out of a 275 gallon oil tank.


tackit - February 17, 2009 02:50 PM (GMT)
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I cut the tank down to 40". I first welded rods through the tank so when the end was cut off the shape would stay the same.

I used my 3/16 cable come a long for a straight edge for the plasma torch to ride around the tank. It worked out great..

tackit - February 17, 2009 02:54 PM (GMT)
front of stove before I trimmed the 1/4"plate to shape ofthe tank.

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tackit - February 17, 2009 02:59 PM (GMT)
I made the hindges out of 1 1/2 " angle iron, the bolts are stainless. I cut the back out of the angle iron so I would have about 1" clearence from the stove where the bolt goes through.

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tackit - February 17, 2009 03:05 PM (GMT)
doors with seals installed
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tackit - February 17, 2009 03:09 PM (GMT)
I welded a nut on the door catch so with a bolt I can adjust the amount of pressure to get a good seal


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tackit - February 17, 2009 03:13 PM (GMT)
Draft I put on top.After studying stoves this type draft is supposed to get a better burn because the flames are reaching for the air at the top. That's a 3/16 baffle before the chimney opening the draft is welded to

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tackit - February 17, 2009 03:18 PM (GMT)
rebar grating


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tackit - February 17, 2009 03:25 PM (GMT)
This shot shows the side angle iron bracing and hiding the rebar ends.... and a 5/8 rod to turn the damper from the front. I built a damper that bolts to the 5/8 rod inside the flighting tube chimney stub.

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tackit - February 17, 2009 03:31 PM (GMT)
I sure hope my poor spelling didn't offend any of you. :lol:

JT Metalworks - February 17, 2009 04:30 PM (GMT)
Are you kidding? We don't need a decoder ring to read it - spelling errors are overlooked in the presence of Jack. B)

Using the come along is a pretty good trick. I usually just use tape.

Franzİ - February 17, 2009 07:19 PM (GMT)
Tack, going with only top draft will give you greif establishing a good fire. Top draft is called "Check" and is used to keep an already established fire controlled. Bottom draft will give you a better fire and do so quickly. Ideal burning is generally acheived with a combination of top & bottom draft.

The jury is still out with that type of stove as to the benefit of preheating the combustion air either by drawing it in around the stack or by putting an air warmer tube along the firebox.

What the jury isn't out on is adding 2 or 3 tubes thru the top of the firebox to carry air with a blower on one end.

A flamestop baffel is always a good idea just inside the firebox to prevent the fire from running the stack.

Are you going to add some fencing to the bottom and cast refractory in place or just use sand?

tackit - February 17, 2009 08:43 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Franzİ @ Feb 17 2009, 02:19 PM)
Tack, going with only top draft will give you greif establishing a good fire.  Top draft is called "Check" and is used to keep an already established fire controlled.  Bottom draft will give you a better fire and do so quickly.  Ideal burning is generally acheived with a combination of top & bottom draft.

The jury is still out with that type of stove as to the benefit of preheating the combustion air either by drawing it in around the stack or by putting an air warmer tube along the firebox.

What the jury isn't out on is adding 2 or 3 tubes thru the top of the firebox to carry air with a blower on one end.

A flamestop baffel is always a good idea just inside the firebox to prevent the fire from running the stack.

Are you going to add some fencing to the bottom and cast refractory in place or just use sand?

I was supposed to get 1 1/4 tube from a friend that had a friend that worked at a tube mill.

I was going to make my own refactory cement and fill the tubes with it and lay the tubes side by side on the bottom. but the tubes never materialized so I'll just use sand. if it all works out I have thought of refratorying the bottom.

I have a baffel before the chimney to keep the fire from going up the flu.


I can make a small draft door in the bottom clean out door to get a bottom draft. Thanks for offering that advice Franz.

I have had thought of wrapping copper tubbing around it and hooking up to a vehicle radiator ontop of the stove with a fan behind it but I need to come up with a ball cock valve to keep the system full.

Franzİ - February 17, 2009 09:16 PM (GMT)
I wouldn't get too concerned with the grate, it really isn't that necessary when burning wood. I took the grate out of my stove because it was more of a pain in the azz cleaning the ashes out than it was worth for burning efficiency. I have a refractory floor in mine sitting on 1½" of insulation board and it has worked well for over 20 years.

If you plan to burn coal you need a grate.

As to water coils, you need to be a bit careful. The coil either needs to be big enough to circulate using the time proven thermosyphon developed 100 years ago, or you have to have an absolutely dependable circulator pump that won't fail when power goes off.

Mine has about 6 feet of schedule 40 ss in the top of the firebox in a U configuration with a circulator pump carrying the "hot" water to a convector radiator equipped with a blower at the far end of the cellar. The heat transferr is pretty efficient, and the water will normally run around 80° in the loop. If the circulator fails the stove will heat the loop inside the stove sufficiently to trip the blowoff in a few minutes. An open system as is favored in outside boilers would probably be superior if you don't have to deal with altitude issues in the water loop.




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