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Title: New Mill


SlimJim - August 6, 2005 01:34 AM (GMT)
Well I finally laid down the cash for my mill. I paid the guy today and got a bill of sale for it so the hard part is over with (turning loose of the money). Now I have to figure out what I am going to do for a phase converter and get it moved to the shop. Here is a couple of pictures of the one i ended up getting. It is a Lioho mill, has acu-rite DRO's, power feed, 2hp motor,has step pulleys,coolant system, some collets and small amount of tooling. Wyoming is going to buy a brand new Kurt D688 vise for me which I thought was very nice of him.


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7018 - August 6, 2005 01:59 AM (GMT)
Well now slim I'm glad to see that you got it.....And it sure was nice of Wyoming to get you a new vise for it...................... :ph43r:

Franzę - August 6, 2005 03:27 AM (GMT)
Well, I'll be damned if I'm gonna be outdone by Wyoming, so I'll go down and sweep up a box of mixed chips & curls off my mill and send em to Jim so he knows what to make with that machine.
It's the least I can do.

Stickman - August 6, 2005 03:31 AM (GMT)
Looks good. Congratulations ;)

Wyoming - August 6, 2005 05:02 AM (GMT)
SlimJim,
A new Kurt D688...? It should be coming across your doorstep as we speak. If you need to check on the status...get ahold of Franzie. I had him place the order after sending the cash out his way...he had an "inside" friend. I believe he said he was having it drop shipped directly to you.

Speaking of drop shipped...UPS broke the first Kurt vise I purchased off of eBay. Never would have believed it possible until that box came through the door. I think they took it as a challenge to their abilities...

What type of current do you need for the Accu-rite, power feed and coolant pump? If they don't need the 3-phase, you aren't running other 3-phase machines, you aren't planning to buy any more 3-phase equipment, etc, etc, etc, you may be better served with a dedicated VFD for the mill. It would give you variable speed, dynamic braking and true 3-phase for a fairly cheap price. Otherwise, go with a rotary phase converter.

Wyoming - August 6, 2005 04:13 PM (GMT)
SlimJim,
When it comes time to move the mill to your shop, swivel the head upside down and crank the table down to the bottom of its travel. This will help to lower the center of gravity on a very top heavy machine.

If it is a true Bridgeport clone...and it does look to be...there should be a tapped hole on top of the ram near the hex head adjuster you can see in the first picture. Buy a forged steel eyebolt and run it down into this hole and you'll have a suitable lifting location for use with an engine hoist for final placement.

After that, get some spindle oil and way oil and you'll be in business.

SlimJim - August 6, 2005 07:00 PM (GMT)
Thanks for the advice buddy. What do you think about that vise choice (make and model)?

SlimJim - August 6, 2005 07:12 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Wyoming @ Aug 6 2005, 12:02 AM)
SlimJim,

What type of current do you need for the Accu-rite, power feed and coolant pump? If they don't need the 3-phase, you aren't running other 3-phase machines, you aren't planning to buy any more 3-phase equipment, etc, etc, etc, you may be better served with a dedicated VFD for the mill. It would give you variable speed, dynamic braking and true 3-phase for a fairly cheap price. Otherwise, go with a rotary phase converter.

I am planning on buying more 3 phase equipment and the lathe I have now is 3 phase but has some type of conversion on it. What should I look at gettting, type, size etc. I want to do it right.

Wyoming - August 6, 2005 07:22 PM (GMT)
SlimJim,
In a bit of a hurry right now...work calls in under an hour. More later...

I doubt you could go wrong if you follow Cutter's lead with his rotary converter build over on SFT. A rotary will give you the capability to add machines downline of the converter as each successive machine acts like another phase converter. Sizing will depend upon several variables...plug reversing, your large current draw, etc. There are a number of good sites on the Internet detailing just how to figure the motor and resister sizing for these converters.

I'll pull out my lathe manual for the Jet 14" and see what they recommend as far as apron oil. Most, if not all, product recommendations are for Mobil products...so they should be readily available to you.

As I said, mor elater. off the work.

Wyoming - August 6, 2005 07:46 PM (GMT)
SlimJim,
Lunch just got packed and I only need to lace up my steel toes...so here is my opinion of Kurt.

Well worth the money as far as milling vises go. You might be able to get a better deal on a clone from Bison or one of the other manufacturers...I don't have a clue as I've never run across one of the clones. Bison and ToolMex do make some quality tools over there in Poland, but their prices are creeping up close to U.S. manufacturers prices. Search on eBay as there always seems to be a good number of Kurt vises listed and the prices with shipping factored in aren't bad. I see you have the base...even if it is from a clone it should work. Wouldn't bother with a rotary base if I was buying new and it wasn't already thrown into the deal...don't use it that much and they take up an inch or so of usable knee travel.

The Kurt Angle-loc vise makes getting the work flat and ready to mill much easier. Prior to this type of vise it was a constant problem of the workpiece lifting in the vise when the jaws were tightened. A brass hammer helped...and still does , even with Kurt vises. I believe, without looking, that the D688 is the ubiquitous Kurt vise that has been offered for years. Easy to set up and rock solid.

Recommend that you get a right angle iron. Makes roughing in the "tramming" a whole lot easier. Truth of the matter...I usually just use the right angle iron to set the quill unless I need more than normal accuracy. A 6"-8" height work great.

Franzę - August 6, 2005 07:48 PM (GMT)
Ahemmm, successive machines on a rotary faker only add to the capacity of the faker when they are running, not when they are just sitting there.

Slim, is that a magnetic table sitting on top of the table of that machine?

Wyoming - August 6, 2005 07:53 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Franzę @ Aug 6 2005, 02:48 PM)
Ahemmm, successive machines on a rotary faker only add to the capacity of the faker when they are running, not when they are just sitting there.

Slim, is that a magnetic table sitting on top of the table of that machine?

Franzie,

As to the additional capacity added by each sucessive machine downline of the rotary converter...your absolutely correct, but I thought that this was a no-brainer.

If that isn't a Kurt or Kurt clone rotary vise base in the pictures instead of a magnetic table I'll eat the darned thing.




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